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11 Signs You Are About To Have a Heart Attack

Heart disease is either the number 1 or number 2 killer of Americans. Heart attacks present themselves differently in each person and even between the sexes.

However, there are enough common symptoms that if you experience one or two of these symptoms suddenly, you may want to either call 911 or visit the ER.


Risks include age (over 65), sex (male), family history, race (African descent), smoking, obesity and diet, lack of exercise, high cholesterol, alcohol consumption, and stress.

You don’t have to have risk factors to have a heart attack, so be aware of symptoms!

11. Chest Pain
Both men and women tend to experience chest pain. In general, chest pain may be pain or may feel like pressure, squeezing, or fullness.

The pain often comes and goes and will last a few minutes. It may occur over several days. People describe the pain differently. Men describe it as an elephant sitting on you; women as a squeezing or feeling of fullness.


Chest pain occurs when your heart is not getting enough…

5 Warning Signs Indicating That Your Bones May Be In Danger

Bones are an essential part of our physique and they prevent the delicate internal organs from being harmed. Our bones become lighter and more fragile as we grow older and it is very common for osteoporosis to set in. This is a gradual process and you may only realize that it has happened when it interferes with your daily lives. These are some indicators you can watch out for to prevent the problem from becoming worse:


Aches
If your bones are aching, you can be certain that they are becoming weaker. This is a symptom of osteoporosis and the condition itself will only become evident when even a little force is enough to damage your bones. The Journal of Pain Research recently released a study which showed that people suffering from osteoporosis experience chronic pain due to deformations in their bones, unbalanced joints, and tense muscles.

Dental Issues
The root and nerves of each tooth are embedded in the gums which are fused to your jawbone. Weakness in the bones can make your gums start receding due to which you are likely to experience the loss and breakage of your tooth. The National Institute of Health’s research showed that women who are suffering from osteoporosis have increased chances of losing teeth. When the density of the bones decreases, the gums become weaker.


Weak Grip
Loss of bone density also causes your grip to become weaker and your bones to become more vulnerable to damage as a result. Studies show that weakening grip in your dominant hand is most commonly linked to the bones in your back, neck, and waist becoming lighter. Without the stability that your bones offer, your muscles won’t be able to hold up your frame.

Delicate Nails
When your fingernails become more fragile it is a sign that you are losing bone density. Keratin and collagen can be found in both your bones and nails. The Journal of Functional Biomaterials recently carried a review which pointed out that the bones and nails are very similar to each other. This is helpful because the development of osteoporosis can be tracked by studying the levels of keratin and collagen in the nails.

Bad Posture
If you start slumping or hunching as you grow older, it is very likely that your bones are experiencing a loss of density. When the spine becomes weaker, your muscles are no longer able to offer support. This makes you look shorter, become less flexible, and can also make your backache. According to Madeline R. Vann, an authority in the field of Public Health, the humped back prevalent among elderly people can cause continuous pain and prevent them from performing their usual routine properly.

While losing bone density is common as you grow older, you can slow down the process by living a healthy lifestyle. A balanced diet rich in calcium and vitamin D and regular exercise can keep you healthier and younger for a longer period of time.